What Are ‘The Basics’ In Education?

survey of American companies concluded that the 4 C’s -

  • Critical thinking and problem solving
  • Creativity and innovation
  • Collaboration
  • Communication Skills

…… are as important as the more traditional 3R’s of reading, writing and arithmetic.

Once upon a time mastery of the 3R’s was enough to get you a job – but the world is changing.

Proficiency in reading, writing, and arithmetic has traditionally been the entry-level threshold to the job market, but the new workplace requires more from its employees. Employees need to think critically, solve problems, innovate, collaborate, and communicate more effectively—and at every level within an organization.

Yet we still want to test our children on reading, writing and maths only. What assessments are schools undertaking to measure the attainment of children in critical thinking & problem solving, creativity and innovation, collaboration, and communication skills?

According to the survey results, executives said these skills and competencies are priorities for employee development, talent management, and succession planning.  In addition, job applicants are assessed in these areas during the hiring process.

Thomas Friedman, in his book, ‘The World Is Flat’, gave the following advice to his daughters:

Girls, when I was growing up, my parents used to say to me, “Tom, finish your dinner – people in China and India are starving.” My advice to you is: “Girls, finish your homework – people in China and India are starving for your jobs.” And in a flat world, they can have them, because in a flat world there is no such thing as an American job. There is just a job, and in more cases than ever before it will go to the best, smartest, most productive, or cheapest worker – wherever he or she resides.

The world is changing. Accountants in India are preparing tax forms for citizens across the world, online. Radiologists in Asia read X-rays taken in North America. If educators are to prepare young people for this new world we must assume that they have some idea of what to prepare them for. I fear that this is not the case.

In the following video you can listen to what Sir Ken Robinson thinks. These are the highlights from his talk in March 2011 at Learning Without Frontiers – ‘Out Of Our Minds – Learning To Be Creative’

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About Mike

Now that I'm retired I have more time to devote to writing my blog and creating short stories.

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